Jul 012020
 

Recorded on January 25, 2018 Shelby Steele, a Hoover Institution senior fellow and author of Shame: How America’s Past Sins Have Polarized Our Country , joins Peter Robinson to discuss race relations in the United States. Steele tells stories about growing up in segregated Chicago and the fights he and his family went through to end segregation in their neighborhood schools. He draws upon his own experiences facing racism while growing up in order to inform his opinions on current events. Steele and Robinson go on to discuss more recent African-American movements, including Steele’s thoughts on the NFL protests, Black Lives Matter, and recent rumors about Oprah Winfrey running for office. About the Guest: Shelby Steele is the Robert J. and Marion E. Oster Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He specializes in the study of race relations, multiculturalism, and affirmative action. He was appointed a Hoover fellow in 1994. Steele has written widely on race in American society and the consequences of contemporary social programs on race relations. Steele holds a PhD in English from the University of Utah, an MA in sociology from Southern Illinois University, and a BA in political science from Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Related Resources: • A Sick Hunger for Racism • Black Protest Has Lost Its Power • The Exhaustion of American Liberalism • End of the Line for the Shame Train

Jul 012020
 


What is “false black power?” According to Jason Riley, author of False Black Power?, it is political clout, whereas true black power is human capital and culture. Riley and Peter Robinson dive into the arguments in Riley’s new book, the history of African Americans in the United States, and welfare inequality in black communities. Riley discusses the Moynihan report of 1965, which documented the rise of black families headed by single women in inner cities and how this report was something black sociologists had already been writing about for several years. He argues that there was clearly a breakdown of the nuclear family and that this is a result of the “Great Society” welfare programs of the 1960s rather than the legacy of slavery or Jim Crow laws. In the 1960s, Riley posits that the black activist community’s shift towards political engagement was misguided. He argues that the idea of black political clout leading to black economic advancement was misplaced. Other impoverished communities (i.e. Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrant communities) at various times in American history focused on economic advancement first before trying to achieve political clout, and they were successful. Instead, the black community focused first on electing black politicians, which ended up doing very little for the economic advancement of the community as politicians typically put their own interests first, above their communities’. Riley points out that the economic data shows that black communities became more impoverished under black leadership. Riley proposes a solution of advocating for more school-choice vouchers, which allow black parents to take better control of their children’s futures and place them in the best schools for them. He also argues for reducing social safety nets, making them a more temporary form of welfare rather than the multigenerational welfare system currently in place.

Jun 302020
 

Today, without warning, YouTube banned our video and podcast channels. We had 135,000 video subscribers and close to 20,000 podcast subscribers. YouTube also banned other channels, including that of Stefan Molyneux. This was all no doubt in honor of George Floyd.

During the Iron Curtain era, who would have suspected that 30 years later Americans would be muzzling each other? It’s trite to say this, but shouldn’t people try to debate those with whom they disagree rather than silence them? There is no more graceless way of admitting you have lost the argument than to gag your opponent.

We will be distributing our videos and podcasts on different platforms so for now, please look for our videos at BitChute, and our podcasts at AmRen.com. And if you have not already done so, please send us your email address so we can alert you to new releases.

Also, I have just joined Parler, and I invite you to follow me here.

These are astonishing times, but the truth will prevail!

Jared Taylor Signature